Assessment of Phytoecological Parameters of Forest Massifs in the Kwilu Province in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Main Article Content

Y. B. da-Musa Masens
Koto-te-Nyiwa Ngbolua
Mandung Masens
John Makiadi Tambu Tembeni
Gédéon Ngiala Bongo

Abstract

Rainforests constitute the great green heart of Africa and thus they present a unique combination of ecological, climatic and human interactions. The degradation of various forest ecosystems in mainly tropical regions and more particularly in sub-Saharan Africa has been a constant reality since the emergence of man. Faced to this almost alarming picture, most often linked to the countless economic challenges and calamitous management and confronted with unavoidable climate change, it seemed appropriate and imperative to assess the quantities of Air Biomass, sequestered carbon stocks, carbon equivalent and basal area produced by various forest massifs encountered in the Kwilu province. This study was carried out at the Kiyaka Agricultural Research Station located in the south of Kikwit. Five blocks of 100 m / 20 m were delineated using a 200 m long nylon wire divided into 10 m intervals. The system thus delimited made it possible to inventory all the trees, of which dbh measured at 1.30 m at chest height is ≥ 10 cm. The findings showed that species are divided into 11 orders, 42 genera and 19 families. The following systematic units are best represented in terms of number of plant species. These families are namely: Fabaceae, Malvaceae, Apocynaceae, Euphorbiaceae and Olacaceae, which together contain 26 plant species, while nine families are poorly represented. However, this reserve is threatened by its occupants on all sides; they do not want to clear large areas of forest for their field work. It is therefore urgent for INERA/Kiyaka officials to take the necessary measures for its full protection.

Keywords:
Phytoecology, forest massifs, Kwilu, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Article Details

How to Cite
Masens, Y. B. da-M., Ngbolua, K.- te-N., Masens, M., Tembeni, J. M. T., & Bongo, G. N. (2020). Assessment of Phytoecological Parameters of Forest Massifs in the Kwilu Province in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Asian Plant Research Journal, 6(4), 8-18. https://doi.org/10.9734/aprj/2020/v6i430134
Section
Original Research Article

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