Exploring the In-vitro Antibacterial Efficacy of Aqueous Extracts from Leaves, Bark, and Stem of Celtis timorensis Span: A Comprehensive Study

GDS Pushpika

Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, General Sir John Kotelawala Defence University, Sri Lanka.

RS Maddumage

Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, General Sir John Kotelawala Defence University, Sri Lanka.

RMHKK Rajapaksha

Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, General Sir John Kotelawala Defence University, Sri Lanka.

YN Wickramaratne

Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, General Sir John Kotelawala Defence University, Sri Lanka.

SP Senanayake

Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, General Sir John Kotelawala Defence University, Sri Lanka.

ARN Silva *

Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, General Sir John Kotelawala Defence University, Sri Lanka.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

The current study evaluated the in-vitro antibacterial activity of Celtis timorensis Span. (C. timorensis) against Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) in response to the global healthcare challenge of infectious diseases caused by Multidrug Resistance organisms. The study was motivated by the inappropriate use of existing antimicrobials and the insufficient discovery of new agents contributing to this crisis. Drawing inspiration from historical evidence in plant-based Ayurveda and traditional medicine, the study focused on C. timorensis, a plant known for its historical use in treating infectious diseases.

Crude extracts from the leaves, bark, and stem of C. timorensis were prepared using the cold maceration process, and their antibacterial activity was assessed against the aforementioned bacterial strains. The cylinder plate method was employed to measure zones of inhibition at various concentrations (250 µg/ml, 500 µg/ml, 750 µg/ml, and 1000 µg/ml). Positive and negative controls included Gentamicin and distilled water respectively. The diameter of inhibition zones was measured after 24 hours of incubation.

Results indicated positive antibacterial effects of all three extracts against E. coli (ATCC 25922) and P. aeruginosa (ATCC 27853). Notably, aqueous extraction from the stem exhibited the highest inhibitory zones against E. coli and P. aeruginosa. However, none of the concentrations of the extracts showed positive antibacterial effects against S. aureus (ATCC 25923). Statistical analysis confirmed the significance of the observed antibacterial activity against E. coli and P. aeruginosa.

Dose-response study results highlighted the efficacy and potency of aqueous extractions from bark and leaves against Escherichia coli. In contrast, leaves and bark demonstrated the highest efficacy and potency, respectively against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In conclusion, the study scientifically validated the hypotheses formulated at the study's outset, utilizing evidence from plant-based Ayurveda and traditional medicine. The findings underscore the potential of C. timorensis as a source of antibacterial agents in the context of addressing multi-drug resistance-related infectious diseases.

Keywords: Celtis timorensis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, antibacterial activity


How to Cite

Pushpika , G., Maddumage , R., Rajapaksha , R., Wickramaratne , Y., Senanayake, S., & Silva, A. (2024). Exploring the In-vitro Antibacterial Efficacy of Aqueous Extracts from Leaves, Bark, and Stem of Celtis timorensis Span: A Comprehensive Study. Asian Plant Research Journal, 12(2), 14–21. https://doi.org/10.9734/aprj/2024/v12i2244

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